Date   

Bug Bounty Update pt. Deux

Dave Huseby
 

As I mentioned in my update email last Friday, I have been negotiating
with HackerOne to secure the lowest possible price for the limited PM
support for our bounty program. To remind you, we need to sign a new
contract with HackerOne for next year and our options for support are:

A. Full PM and Triage support.
B. Limited PM support.
C. Email only support.

I think we should go with options B or C. I was negotiating for the
best price on B, since C is free. HackerOne quoted $10k for option B.

My recommendation is:
1. We go with option C.
2. We put the money we save into the bounty pool and a marketing budget.
3. We bump up the bounty awards and/or do limited promotional awards.
4. We spend some money marketing our bounty program.

Cheers!
Dave
---
David Huseby
Security Maven, Hyperledger
The Linux Foundation
+1-206-234-2392
dhuseby@linuxfoundation.org


Identity WG Call tomorrow

Vipin Bharathan
 

Hello everyone,
 We have a call of the Identity WG tomorrow Sept 5th 12 noon EST will happen on Zoom...(details below)
Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/my/hyperledger.community
Or iPhone one-tap :

US: +16465588656,,4034983298# or +16699006833,,4034983298#

Or Telephone:
Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

US: +1 646 558 8656 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 855 880 1246 (Toll Free) or +1 877 369 0926 (Toll Free)

Meeting ID: 403 498 3298

International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/bAaJoyznpThis is an open call, all are welcome.-


Please volunteer:


Meeting minutes:

Agenda:
  • Announce start of call
  • Anti-Trust
  • IBANP proposal - presentation by IBANP team-
  • Continue discussion on paper progress-  Many corrections and clarifications Thanks to Sze Wong and Eric Bourdin and many others
  • Next steps are SSI, Iroha and Sawtoooth.
  • Add material on IDoT as suggested. 
  • All other business.


Re: [Hyperledger Iroha DevOps] Agenda item suggestion

Ry Jones
 

All,

While I was looking at the security audit logs for another reason, I noticed DCO had been disabled in an Iroha repository. As Brian mentioned, the Hyperledger charter requires that all contributions have a DCO sign off, regardless of whether they are done on a branch or master. DCO must be enabled on all branches.


I also noticed that several external contributors (i.e., contributors outside of the existing Hyperledger groups) had been added directly to projects as admins. This is not bad, but it does make managing permissions harder. Instead, these contributors should be added to existing groups. The pain point is that permissions in GitHub are not very granular. The Linux Foundation IT (LFIT) team is working on a tool to allow group membership to be managed by pull request, which would obviate the need for admin delegation.


Both GitHub integrations and group memberships should be managed via helpdesk@.... Time zones remain a challenge. There is a dedicated Chat channel for support - #infra-support. Hyperledger is, in several ways, at the forefront. Since other projects within The Linux Foundation use Gerrit instead of Github, our tooling is not as advanced as we would like. We're open to input on how better to manage the organization in a transparent way.


In the future, we will work more closely with teams on GitHub to ensure changes to configurations do not happen as a surprise. In order to unblock Iroha, please join us on #infra-support and let’s work through the blocking issues.

Ry




On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 12:13 AM, Nikolay Yushkevich <nikolai@...> wrote:

Hi Brian,

We need to discuss this somehow so that we can continue our work. For now we have blockers as I understand and the team is frustrated. I totally agree with your point about DCO, but in order to fix commit signature it in development branch we have to force push in order to rename commit in it. We are working currently in "dev" branch instead of "develop" and I don't feel like this is a good solution. We are open to any kind of dialog and request your help in order to decide together how can we prevent any similar issues in the future.

Nikolai.




--
Ry Jones
Community Architect, Hyperledger
Chat: @ry


Hyperledger Global Forum Schedule Announced and NEW MonetaGo & Scantrust Case Studies!

Duncan Johnston-Watt
 

Great to wake up to this in APAC.

“Unlike other systems, [Fabric] has support for writing business logic (what you might call ‘smart contracts’) in Go, JavaScript, and soon Java,” he explains. “It has also been fine-tuned to operate in environments where performance (time to finality, combined with the number of transactions per second) are optimized.”


Really? I'd say Fabric is "quite" unique in this respect. In the sense of someone being half pregnant.

We need to sort this out at the Member Summit.

Best

Duncan

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Hyperledger <no-reply@...>
Date: Sat, Sep 1, 2018 at 2:05 AM
Subject: Hyperledger Global Forum Schedule Announced and NEW MonetaGo & Scantrust Case Studies!
To: duncan@...


new
Hyperledger The latest news from Hyperledger.
 
 

The Schedule for Hyperledger Global Forum is Now Live!


Join us at Hyperledger Global Forum taking place in Basel, Switzerland December 12-15, 2018, to see real business uses of distributed ledger technologies and to learn how these innovative technologies run in production across the globe today. With more than 75 sessions and plenty of face-to-face collaboration, this is your chance to learn the latest advancements in Hyperledger business blockchain development though live demos, roadmaps, hands-on workshops, case studies, and more. Plan your schedule today!
 
View the Full Schedule »
 
Announcements

Hyperledger is pleased to welcome 13 new members to its global community. The latest general members to join include: Bezant Foundation, Blinking, ChainNinja, China Securities Credit Investment, Datapace, Estateably, FinFabrik, Intain, and SoluTech. Associate members to join include: AAIS (American Association of Insurance Services), Center for CPS & IoT (CCI) at USC Viterbi School of Engineering, Penn Blockchain Club and Yale University.

Read The Release »
 
In the News
 

Blockchain Is Starting to Show Real Promise Amid the Hype

The blockchain revolution is here and starting to show real promise, according to Barron’s. The technology long associated with Bitcoin is now being used to make businesses as varied as trade finance, videogaming, travel insurance, and diamond mining more efficient and more secure.

Read More »

Behlendorf: Google Can Benefit From “High-Velocity Development on Fabric”

Google is the latest tech giant to offer blockchain technology to its customers. The company announced it will introduce open-source integrations for applications built with both Ethereum and Hyperledger Fabric later this year through its Google Cloud Product marketplace.

Read More »
 

Hyperledger Could Open Source your Business Using Blockchain

Hyperledger is comprised of 10 open source blockchain projects, all of which work across many industries. Ledger Insights spoke to Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf, and explored the likelihood of industry-specific open source blockchains. Open source could also significantly impact the governance of industry consortia and increase the pace of innovation.

Read More »
 
Cloud Native Monthly
 
 

New Hyperledger Project Releases Are Here!

Check out the new features for Hyperledger Sawtooth 1.0.5 and Hyperledger Fabric 1.2
Read more about Hyperledger Burrow 0.20.1 via the new blog

LEARN MORE »

Hyperledger Hackfest | October 3 - 4, 2018 | Montreal, Canada

Join fellow developers working on the different projects hosted in the Hyperledger greenhouse. The primary goal of the hackfest is to facilitate software development collaboration and knowledge sharing between participants.

LEARN MORE »
 
New Production Deployment Case Studies
New Case Study: How ScanTrust Brought Transparency to the
Supply Chain with
Hyperledger Sawtooth

New Case Study: MonetaGo builds world’s first
blockchain production
network with
Hyperledger Fabric

 
ScanTrust used Hyperledger Sawtooth to deploy a blockchain-enabled supply chain traceability function for their client, Cambio Coffee, bringing transparency to the ethical trade business from harvest in Peru, roasting in Shanghai and delivery to your home. MonetaGo created a solution with Hyperledger Fabric to help SMEs gain better access to financing through real-time exchanges for secure, fraud-proof factoring of invoices. Three months after going live, the network already serves a significant percentage of the factoring market in India, processing thousands of invoices daily with no duplicate financing.
Read Case Study » Read Case Study » 
 
Community Spotlight

This month, we showcase Gert Sylvest, Hyperledger Governing Board Member and Co-founder & VP of Global Network Strategy at Premier Member company Tradeshift. Hear Gert share his thoughts on on the modular approach to blockchain, how it’s transforming the world, and the importance of sharing use cases to help bring the technology forward.

 READ MORE »

 
Developer Showcase

In this blog series, we highlight the work and motivations of developers, users and researchers collaborating on Hyperledger projects. This month, we spotlight Saurav Anand and Enrico Zanardo.
 
Saurav
Saurav Anand
Senior Software Engineer, Near.co
Zac Delventhal, Software Engineer, Bitwise IO
Enrico Zanardo
OneZero Binary Ltd
Read Blog » Read Blog »
Upcoming Events
 
BlockWorld
September 12 - 14, 2018 | San Jose, CA
BlockWorld 2018 will bring together 3,000 participants for a crowd-powered blockchain event that will vote on top speakers, awards, startup pitches, and digital book entries. Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf will present at this event.
Mobile World Congress Americas
August 24 - 26, 2018 | Los Angeles, CA
The mobile world will connect in Los Angeles, CA for the second annual MWC Americas. Attend to discover the future of mobile as top companies give an exclusive first look at the latest innovations. Hyperledger Executive Director, Brian Behlendorf will present at this event.
Blockchain Unchained
September 12 - 14, 2018 | Geneva, Switzerland
Blockchain Unchained aims to make blockchain technology comprehensible and accessible to the general public and raise awareness of how this new technology can be used in a myriad of business and banking ventures. Travin Keith, Founder of Hyperledger member company Agavon, will speak on two panels.
Hyperledger Global Forum 
December 12 - 15, 2018 | Basel, Switzerland
The premier event showcasing the real uses of distributed ledger technologies for businesses and how these innovative technologies run live in production networks today.
 
View More Upcoming Events »  
 
Get Involved

Webinar: A hitchhiker’s guide to deploying Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes
Wednesday, September, 26 2018 - 9:00am Pacific Time
Deploying a multi-component system like Hyperledger Fabric to production is challenging. In this webinar AID: Technology will lower the threshold by showing how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric on Kubernetes through the usage of Helm Charts to provide a working blockchain system.

 SIGN UP FOR WEBINAR »
 

Blockchain Study by University of Cambridge
Hyperledger Associate Member Cambridge Centre for Alternative Finance at the University of Cambridge is conducting an empirical study on the current state and evolution of the enterprise blockchain ecosystem with three surveys: Blockchain vendors, Blockchain network/app operators, and users. Help raise awareness and participate in the study!

 LEARN MORE »
 
Hyperledger Meetups Around the Globe
The Hyperledger Meetup scene continues to thrive in 2018. We now have 43,000+ members across 145 different Meetup groups all around the world!

FIND A MEETUP NEAR YOU »
 
 
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--


Bug Bounty Update

Dave Huseby
 

Hello TSC,

We are nearing the end of our first year of the Hyperledger Fabric bug
bounty program (October 20th) and I would like to report back to the
TSC on the previous year and ask for your guidance on the year ahead.

The relevant statistics for our bug bounty are:

Total bug reports: 22
Total valid bugs: 3
Total bounties paid: $700 (1 x $500, 2 x $100)
Bounty payout amounts:
Critical: $2000
High: $1500
Medium: $500
Low: $200

The first six months were executed on an invite-only basis. HackerOne
invited 174 of their vetted analysts to participate in our bounty.
Only 72 accepted and at the end of 6 months we had 0 valid bug
reports. Because we had no reports, HackerOne decided to not charge
us for the triage service we had signed up for, so the first six
months were free to us. HackerOne surveyed their analysts to get
feedback on why the lack of participation and found the following
reasons for rejection:

Specialization: 26
Uninteresting: 17
Competitiveness: 11
Small Scope: 10
Onerous Setup: 9
Skills mismatch: 7
Clarity: 6
Unresponsive: 6
Hardened: 5
Objection: 5
Unattractive: 4
Access criteria: 2
Aggressive Policy: 2
Payouts are too low: 2
Scope is too small: 2
Payout structure unclear or lacking: 1

The results are what I expected, most of the analysts in HackerOne's
pool specialize in web application testing and not blockchains. After
the lack of success in the first six months we decided to open the
bounty program up to the public, increase the bounties, and market it
with blog posts and announcements.

Immediately we had more interest and we received a flood of bug
reports telling us that our JIRA, jenkins, and source code are all
publicly visible. I wrote a lot of emails explaining that we're an
open source organization and we did that on purpose. In the noise
however, we did receive three bugs worth paying attention to. Two
were configuration issues with our infrastructure and one was a bug in
Fabric. All were fixed and small bounties were paid.

We paid $10,000 for 6 months of triage service from HackerOne. They
served as the front line of triage and kept our average response time
at around 11 hours. They also filtered all of the reports that were
out of scope and had no relevance.

The time has come for us to renew our contract with HackerOne. The
question for the TSC is whether we want to spend the money to keep the
triage service. Our options are to keep going at the same rate, reduce
to just PM support--I'm negotiating the price right now--or drop to no
formal support other than email support. If we drop formal support,
we will have no reoccurring costs, just the bounty payouts. We do pay
HackerOne 20% fees on the bounties paid through their platform but
they handle all of the tax paperwork and can pay out in many different
currencies, including crypto-currencies. If we drop to just PM
support the price will be less than the $10k per six months we paid
for triage, but more than $0. I'll report back when I reach a final
price with HackerOne.

My recommendation is to either drop to PM or go to no formal support
depending on the cost of the PM. We have an all-volunteer security
team that hasn't needed to engage too much because HackerOne has been
handling triage. So if we drop all formal support, our security
team--including me--will be solely responsible for triage and
response.

The question before the TSC is: what level of support should we sign
up for at HackerOne?

Questions? I will be at the next TSC meeting and I've asked Todd to
add to the agenda for some Q&A if you don't want to do this over
email.

Cheers!
Dave
---
David Huseby
Security Maven, Hyperledger
The Linux Foundation
+1-206-234-2392
dhuseby@linuxfoundation.org


Re: [Hyperledger Iroha DevOps] Agenda item suggestion

Nikolay Yushkevich
 

Hi Brian,

We need to discuss this somehow so that we can continue our work. For now we have blockers as I understand and the team is frustrated. I totally agree with your point about DCO, but in order to fix commit signature it in development branch we have to force push in order to rename commit in it. We are working currently in "dev" branch instead of "develop" and I don't feel like this is a good solution. We are open to any kind of dialog and request your help in order to decide together how can we prevent any similar issues in the future.

Nikolai.


Minutes / August 30th, 2018

Todd Benzies <tbenzies@...>
 

Hyperledger Project

Technical Steering Committee (TSC) Meeting

August 30, 2018 (7:00am - 8:00am PT)

via Zoom


TSC Members

Arnaud Le Hors

Yes

Baohua Yang

Yes

Binh Nguyen

Yes

Christopher Ferris

Yes

Dan Middleton

Yes

Hart Montgomery

Yes

Kelly Olson

Yes

Mark Wagner

Yes

Mic Bowman

Yes

Nathan George


Silas Davis

Yes


Resources:


Event Reminders


Annual TSC Chair Election

  • Chris Ferris and Dan Middleton are running for the Chair position

  • 11 TSC Members will vote (per Charter) and results will be announced next Wednesday evening in TSC


Hyperledger Community Health WG

  • Ry provided an overview of the Community Health discussion

  • Concerns raised as to whether this initiative is more focused to help projects/WGs/communities to improve their metrics, or rather in policing/advising on what the metrics should be.

  • Tracy noted that the goal is to help tangibly improve the overall community health in the various projects, but to do this in a scalable way across all projects, not in a one-off manner -- what’s working or not working and what kind of patterns from healthier communities can we identify and encourage more broadly.

  • Tracy/Ry to revise proposal based on feedback from TSC discussion.


Quarterly project updates

  • Simon Stone provided the Hyperledger Composer update

    • Any production usage with Composer?

      • One.

    • Is this sunset of Composer or simply reducing investment in it?

      • Just the IBM devs are reducing time on Composer, but will continue to update to support Hyperledger Fabric releases and maintain existing compatibility (but, will not be doing any new features).

    • Anything you can do in Composer that you cannot do in Fabric?

      • Yes (i.e. private data collections)

    • Is the modeling aspect of Composer going to disappear?

      • Composer is not going anywhere -- you can continue to model blockchain use cases.  We believe that modeling your blockchain networks is the way forward. For example, the work from Dan Selman where we look at pulling out modeling language and embed into other frameworks (It is a library, it is valuable code).

    • A suggestion was made to have the “future of Composer” discussion on the Composer dev list.

  • [moved to September 6th due to timing] Hyperledger Cello update

  • September 13th:  Hyperledger Explorer update


Quarterly WG updates

  • No updates due this week

  • September 6th:  Architecture WG update


[pending] Copyright discussion -- with Hyperledger Legal Committee (meeting has been scheduled)




--
Todd Benzies
Sr. Director, Program Management & Operations
The Linux Foundation
+1 (415) 412-0310 (m)


Agenda for August 30th, 2018

Todd Benzies <tbenzies@...>
 

  • Event Reminders
  • Annual TSC Chair Election
    • Chris Ferris and Dan Middleton are running for the Chair position
    • 11 TSC Members will vote (per Charter) and results will be announced next Wednesday evening in TSC Agenda
  • Hyperledger Community Health WG discussion
  • Quarterly project updates
    • [4 weeks overdue] Hyperledger Composer update
    • Hyperledger Cello update
    • September 13th:  Hyperledger Explorer update
  • Quarterly WG updates
    • No updates due this week
    • September 6th:  Architecture WG update
  • [pending] Copyright discussion -- with Hyperledger Legal Committee


--
Todd Benzies
Sr. Director, Program Management & Operations
The Linux Foundation
+1 (415) 412-0310 (m)


Re: [Hyperledger Iroha DevOps] Agenda item suggestion

Brian Behlendorf
 

Hi Artyom,

While we sort out how changes were made without great communication with the Iroha dev team, it should be kept in mind that we require DCOs for every line of code that makes it into a Hyperledger release.  Commits made on branches that may be brought over to the master runs the risk of letting commits through (especially if in squished commits) that lose that provenance tracking.  Ideally nothing goes into any Hyperledger GH repo without coming from someone with a filed DCO.  So granting an exception to allow it should be done in narrow and controlled ways, especially to automated tools.

For this reason, admin privs to HL repos are managed by LF staff.  Where it may be granted temporarily to assist in the migration to HL, it should not have been expected to be retained long term.  Adding new maintainers and repos should be a fast turn-around process and we can look at whether that's fast enough.  But I think we need to find ways for the CI/CD processes to not need HL repo commit privileges that could lead to a slip up in legal provenance tracking.  I'll let Ry follow up with more details, and let's see if out of that there arise issues worth discussing on the TSC.

Thanks,

Brian

On 08/29/2018 04:59 AM, Artyom Bakhtin wrote:
Hello,
Hyperledger Iroha DevOps team have recently been revoked admin permissions on Hyperledger Iroha Github repository. It was the second time it happened. At first it was justified by having disabled DCO on master branch. We disabled it temporarily to resolve merge conflicts in the branch. We took into consideration that fact and were keeping DCO check enabled on 'develop' and 'master' branch. Some time later I found that required number of approvals on 'develop' branch is 1 (instead of 2 as required by our policy). There was also DCO check enabled on non-related 'ci-integration-develop'. I suppose this was set by HL admins. DevOps team was revoked admin permissions once these settings have been switched back to normal values.

HL Helpdesk took 4 days to respond on my request on why this happened for the second time. We have been offered to contact Helpdesk each time the settings should be tuned in Github repo. While we honor efforts HL is doing for us, we can not afford several days lag between contacting Helpdesk and setting up requested parameters.

There are several functions in Github repo (hyperledger/iroha & hyperledger/libiroha) we want to have an access to:
   - Management of collaborators. As soon as HL adds a new member in organisation, they should be added to several repositories as well.
   - Webhooks. As we heavily utilize continuous integration system and accompanying services, it is required to manage secret tokens
   - Branches. We may need to enable additional checks on particular test branches.

I am not aware of Github capabilities to restrict a member to these particular settings. Thus, we suggest to agree on a list of branches that require DCO. Maybe some other settings that must conform to HL policy. And grant admin permissions back.

Can we discuss somehow what we can do? This is a suggestion to review TSC agenda and include discussion related to management of codebase on GitHub and help us resolve work blockers. Thanks.


-- 
Brian Behlendorf
Executive Director, Hyperledger
bbehlendorf@...
Twitter: @brianbehlendorf


[Hyperledger Iroha DevOps] Agenda item suggestion

Artyom Bakhtin <bakhtin@...>
 

Hello,
Hyperledger Iroha DevOps team have recently been revoked admin permissions on Hyperledger Iroha Github repository. It was the second time it happened. At first it was justified by having disabled DCO on master branch. We disabled it temporarily to resolve merge conflicts in the branch. We took into consideration that fact and were keeping DCO check enabled on 'develop' and 'master' branch. Some time later I found that required number of approvals on 'develop' branch is 1 (instead of 2 as required by our policy). There was also DCO check enabled on non-related 'ci-integration-develop'. I suppose this was set by HL admins. DevOps team was revoked admin permissions once these settings have been switched back to normal values.

HL Helpdesk took 4 days to respond on my request on why this happened for the second time. We have been offered to contact Helpdesk each time the settings should be tuned in Github repo. While we honor efforts HL is doing for us, we can not afford several days lag between contacting Helpdesk and setting up requested parameters.

There are several functions in Github repo (hyperledger/iroha & hyperledger/libiroha) we want to have an access to:
   - Management of collaborators. As soon as HL adds a new member in organisation, they should be added to several repositories as well.
   - Webhooks. As we heavily utilize continuous integration system and accompanying services, it is required to manage secret tokens
   - Branches. We may need to enable additional checks on particular test branches.

I am not aware of Github capabilities to restrict a member to these particular settings. Thus, we suggest to agree on a list of branches that require DCO. Maybe some other settings that must conform to HL policy. And grant admin permissions back.

Can we discuss somehow what we can do? This is a suggestion to review TSC agenda and include discussion related to management of codebase on GitHub and help us resolve work blockers. Thanks.


Re: ** Newsletter/Marketing email** Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

jairo.marugan@wipro.com <jairo.marugan@...>
 

Hi all,

I can not agree more with all you are saying ... really good initiatives to mitigate the big/global problem we have ...but I believe that the real solution is early on EDUCATION, tackling the problem from the root ...  (no that extreme gentrification, no more boys playing with trucks and girls playing with dolls ...)

regarding the color of the skin ... I think the real problem is not the color itself, it's the social status, financial level, the access to resources and education and sometimes also the stigma we have created over them ...

regarding women, we have seen great improvements globally over the last few years but we need to do more at all levels:  our company leaders, enterprise culture, sector ....move beyond the "one size fits all", create and nurture relationships withing our companies and industries, support and measure progress ... it's a pity but right now they (women) need our (men) support if they want to success, that shouldn't happen .... everybody should have access to the same opportunities ...

But as a leader (man or woman) never forget that regardless of gender, we all have incredible features but sometimes different so we should use different measurement tools ...  As Albert Einstein said: " Everybody is a genius. but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid"

Jairo Romo Marugan




From: identity-wg@... <identity-wg@...> on behalf of Chainsaw <mark.morris@...>
Sent: Friday, August 24, 2018 10:40 AM
To: Gopal
Cc: Kaliya Identity Woman; Kyle Den Hartog; =Drummond Reed; Mark Simpson; Vipin Bharathan; tsc@...; Identity-WG@...; architecture-wg@...; perf-and-scale-wg@...; blythe@...; Uwaje, Nkiruka
Subject: ** Newsletter/Marketing email** Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?
 

** This mail has been sent from an external source. Treat hyperlinks and attachments in this email with caution**

Gopal you inspire! 
Thank you. 
-Mark

On Aug 24, 2018, at 12:17 PM, Gopal <gopal.panda@...> wrote:

Hi ,
In last 6 months i have attended many meetings , but not in one meeting i have seen that people are against each other or against color or opposite . I know except few people almost everyone is working out of passion. Just to justify diversity if we want to force certain group/individual present in meeting which is not practical, we are missing the essence of open source collaboration. In my past i have faced people being hostile to me, but not in LF meetings . It is not any country specific, thats human nature . 

I have seen 2 people from Linux Foundation present in almost all the meetings , if we take into account of how many people are subscribed for each group VS people attending meeting you will be surprised how many people show up to those meeting. Try attending other meetings you will see that max 6 to 7 people attend meetings. Expect for TSC meeting where you can find little over 20 people.

Now if we take average of 7 people per meeting on what basis you want to divide these dedicated passionate people who are willing to spend their precious time for these projects rather than with their friends and family. You have to be sensitive and thankful to them.

So lets focus on building a community based on passion not on Agendas. Otherwise we will be caught up in agendas and will not be able to complete any project on time.  

Thanks
Gopal Panda


------ Original Message ------
From: "Kaliya Identity Woman" <kaliya@...>
To: "Kyle Den Hartog" <kyle.denhartog@...>
Sent: 8/23/2018 6:02:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...>wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...>wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org" <Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org>, "architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread. 

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all, 

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:

Dear Dan 

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org<blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob 

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob, 

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Bob Summerwill
 

BTW - I have spotted another diversity issue in Hyperledger:

We have too many Dans (O'Prey, Middleton, Selman) and not enough diversity of other first names.  I am not sure how we work to address this, but it is food for thought!

Have a great weekend, everyone :-)

PS. Great input, everybody.   So happy to see this discussion happening.


On Fri, Aug 24, 2018 at 9:59 AM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:
Kaliya,

That is all awesome.  Thank you so much for dropping those knowledge bombs on the Hyperledger community :-)

I love the White Men as Full Diversity Partners approach.  That makes so much sense to me.   Female colleagues of mine in blockchain frequently highlight that the lazy default response of having the small number of very active women in any community "carrying the load" of our diversity issues makes very little sense.   It is not the women or people of color who are the problem!   Also, those individuals are busy trying to do their work and struggling against the tide in even doing that.

I am a Community Ambassador for https://cryptochicks.ca because I think it is my responsibility as a man and a father and indeed just as a human being to do whatever I can to help to address the inclusion issues I see all the time in blockchain.   There are so many overlapping cultural issues, but gender is obviously the most blatant inclusion issue, as  I highlighted at the very start of this thread.

I am delighted to have triggered this discussion.   I hope that people who are in a position to make a difference do take this issue seriously and do the work, as you suggest.

Best wishes!  I loved your talk in SF at Decentralized Summit.  Thanks for everything you do.

On Thu., Aug. 23, 2018, 6:02 p.m. Kaliya Identity Woman, <kaliya@...> wrote:
HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...> wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org" <Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org>, "architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Minutes / August 23rd, 2018

Todd Benzies <tbenzies@...>
 

Hyperledger Project

Technical Steering Committee (TSC) Meeting

August 23, 2018 (7:00am - 8:00am PT)

via GoToMeeting


TSC Members

Arnaud Le Hors

Yes

Baohua Yang

Yes

Binh Nguyen

Yes

Christopher Ferris


Dan Middleton

Yes

Hart Montgomery

Yes

Kelly Olson

Yes

Mark Wagner

Yes

Mic Bowman


Nathan George


Silas Davis

Yes


Resources:


Event Reminders


Annual TSC Election-

  • 2018-2019 TSC (in alphabetical order), effective today:

    • Arnaud Le Hors

    • Baohua Yang

    • Binh Nguyen

    • Christopher Ferris

    • Dan Middleton

    • Hart Montgomery

    • Kelly Olson

    • Mark Wagner

    • Mic Bowman

    • Nathan George

    • Silas Davis


Quarterly project updates

  • [3 weeks overdue] Hyperledger Composer update

  • Silas Davis provided the Hyperledger Burrow update

    • Can you clarify the point about chain stability?  Can you edit history?

      • We want to have an actually stable chain to run a long time; next best thing is to be able to stop chain (by agreement with rest of network quorum), look at issue that happened, and re-run state.  It is not recommended in principle, but, if there is a code issue, it is the next best thing from just throwing away the history

    • Can you elaborate about the usefulness of common infrastructure?

      • CNCF has shared infra, for example.  The advantage would be in reducing the amount of stuff we have to operate, and increasing visibility of where projects are in testing.

  • Next week:  Hyperledger Cello update


Quarterly WG updates

  • TWGC Chair discussion

    • Baohua noted that the WG was created with 3 co-Chairs (two of which are not longer actively involved)

    • The WG called for nominations and ran an election, resulting in support for Zhenhua Zhao and Jiannan (Jay) Guo to join Baohua as co-Chairs

    • VOTE:  unanimously approved by TSC

  • September 6th:  Architecture WG update


[pending] Copyright discussion -- with Hyperledger Legal Committee




--
Todd Benzies
Sr. Director, Program Management & Operations
The Linux Foundation
+1 (415) 412-0310 (m)


Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Mark Anthony Morris
 

Gopal you inspire! 
Thank you. 
-Mark

On Aug 24, 2018, at 12:17 PM, Gopal <gopal.panda@...> wrote:

Hi ,
In last 6 months i have attended many meetings , but not in one meeting i have seen that people are against each other or against color or opposite . I know except few people almost everyone is working out of passion. Just to justify diversity if we want to force certain group/individual present in meeting which is not practical, we are missing the essence of open source collaboration. In my past i have faced people being hostile to me, but not in LF meetings . It is not any country specific, thats human nature . 

I have seen 2 people from Linux Foundation present in almost all the meetings , if we take into account of how many people are subscribed for each group VS people attending meeting you will be surprised how many people show up to those meeting. Try attending other meetings you will see that max 6 to 7 people attend meetings. Expect for TSC meeting where you can find little over 20 people.

Now if we take average of 7 people per meeting on what basis you want to divide these dedicated passionate people who are willing to spend their precious time for these projects rather than with their friends and family. You have to be sensitive and thankful to them.

So lets focus on building a community based on passion not on Agendas. Otherwise we will be caught up in agendas and will not be able to complete any project on time.  

Thanks
Gopal Panda


------ Original Message ------
From: "Kaliya Identity Woman" <kaliya@...>
To: "Kyle Den Hartog" <kyle.denhartog@...>
Sent: 8/23/2018 6:02:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...>wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...>wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org" <Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org>, "architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread. 

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all, 

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:

Dear Dan 

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org<blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob 

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob, 

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Gopal K Panda
 

Hi ,
In last 6 months i have attended many meetings , but not in one meeting i have seen that people are against each other or against color or opposite . I know except few people almost everyone is working out of passion. Just to justify diversity if we want to force certain group/individual present in meeting which is not practical, we are missing the essence of open source collaboration. In my past i have faced people being hostile to me, but not in LF meetings . It is not any country specific, thats human nature . 

I have seen 2 people from Linux Foundation present in almost all the meetings , if we take into account of how many people are subscribed for each group VS people attending meeting you will be surprised how many people show up to those meeting. Try attending other meetings you will see that max 6 to 7 people attend meetings. Expect for TSC meeting where you can find little over 20 people.

Now if we take average of 7 people per meeting on what basis you want to divide these dedicated passionate people who are willing to spend their precious time for these projects rather than with their friends and family. You have to be sensitive and thankful to them.

So lets focus on building a community based on passion not on Agendas. Otherwise we will be caught up in agendas and will not be able to complete any project on time.  

Thanks
Gopal Panda


------ Original Message ------
From: "Kaliya Identity Woman" <kaliya@...>
To: "Kyle Den Hartog" <kyle.denhartog@...>
Cc: "=Drummond Reed" <drummond.reed@...>; "Mark Simpson" <mark.simpson@...>; "Vipin Bharathan" <vipinsun@...>; "tsc@..." <tsc@...>; "Identity-WG@..." <Identity-WG@...>; "architecture-wg@..." <architecture-wg@...>; "perf-and-scale-wg@..." <perf-and-scale-wg@...>; "blythe@..." <blythe@...>; "Uwaje, Nkiruka" <Nkiruka.Uwaje@...>
Sent: 8/23/2018 6:02:08 PM
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...> wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org" <Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org>, "architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
 

HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...> wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org" <Identity-WG@lists.hyperledger.org>, "architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <architecture-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@lists.hyperledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Bob Summerwill
 

Kaliya,

That is all awesome.  Thank you so much for dropping those knowledge bombs on the Hyperledger community :-)

I love the White Men as Full Diversity Partners approach.  That makes so much sense to me.   Female colleagues of mine in blockchain frequently highlight that the lazy default response of having the small number of very active women in any community "carrying the load" of our diversity issues makes very little sense.   It is not the women or people of color who are the problem!   Also, those individuals are busy trying to do their work and struggling against the tide in even doing that.

I am a Community Ambassador for https://cryptochicks.ca because I think it is my responsibility as a man and a father and indeed just as a human being to do whatever I can to help to address the inclusion issues I see all the time in blockchain.   There are so many overlapping cultural issues, but gender is obviously the most blatant inclusion issue, as  I highlighted at the very start of this thread.

I am delighted to have triggered this discussion.   I hope that people who are in a position to make a difference do take this issue seriously and do the work, as you suggest.

Best wishes!  I loved your talk in SF at Decentralized Summit.  Thanks for everything you do.


On Thu., Aug. 23, 2018, 6:02 p.m. Kaliya Identity Woman, <kaliya@...> wrote:
HI Kyle, 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:31 PM, Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...> wrote:
I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects.

I didn't make this recommendation. 
While it is a good recommendation on one level. It may be putting the cart before the horse in another level. 

The cultural work that needs to be done so that the likelyhood of white women and men and women of color will have less bad experiences in our communities is work that is better done before one does the hard work of inviting people into participate. 

Instead of working to invite a bunch of folks in...and then they experience the default regular stuff that "always happens" (despite people's good intentions) 

It would be a better story to be like "Hey, our community did some introspection we noticed there we not so many white woman and men and women of color here, we went and hired some folks, did some training, learned some new skills, cultural frames, we are still early days but we actually started the work we need to do to make things better, to are trying to be proactilvey more inclusive,  and welcoming.   I'd like to invite you to _____, meetup, event, webinar, weekly call, check out our GitHub (whatever)  we know we won't be perfect right away - we are still new at this but we are working hard and ___, ___, and ___ have gone beyond the basics and have done allyship training." <<<--- that story is impressive. It will likely get people to say YES to at least stepping a toe in the water of the community.   

Also a thing to do is talk to the people who ARE IN THE community who are white women and men and women people of color about what is working for them, what isn't working for them and what it would take for them to invite more people like themselves in. Because they aren't inviting their friends in for a good reasons and until those reasons are addressed - they themselves are willing to "tolerate them" but they are't willing to explore their friends and colleagues to them. 

What I have learned as a white immigrant woman to the US is that the experiences of people of color are different then mine and I have learned huge amounts from my black friends who have explained to me cultural patterns and things that happen to them regularly. Now I see those things. I work hard not to do them. They are subtle and pervasive.  They are done by people who "don't have a racist or sexist bone in their bodies" We live in a deeply racist and sexist culture that is like water - we can't see it. Implicit bias goes very very deep. The slow work of 1) understanding it is there 2) doing something about it.  

Implicit bias - Blind Spot The Hidden Biases of Good People 
 Had the opportunity to take a class with her at Harvard in an Executive Leadership program I went through

Then there is 3) going beyond just implicit bias to a sort of proactive inclusion stance that truly embraces cultural differences and INCLUSIVE which Is quite different then passively "open". 

I know Steven Frost via my participation in the Young Global Leader Community 

Here is his site - https://frostincluded.com
He has a book out - http://inclusionimperative.com

I think the issue faced in the open source communities is bigger then within companies with boundaries and clear who is "in". 

I think the issue faced by communities that are even bigger then projects (like for example the identity community that has many organizations and lots of activity but there is really no place to go if things get off the rails other then peers (Who often tell you to drop things "cause" its easier that way)

None the less this is the cultural moment we are in. 

I'm grateful that this conversation is happening. 

I am working with a woman who was also at the Decentralized Web Summit on a Webinar we are going to call "White Dudes, Get a Clue" to provide some like starter level education about the stuff you don't see cause you are fully "in" the culture that isn't really fun to be in if you aren't you. It is tiring and grating and after about 10 years we have had enough and we leave.  That isn't our fault for not leaning in. We leave because we want our sanity and we don't want it to be "that hard" to do our work. 

It would be great if Hyperledger/ Linux Foundation got behind funding some basic educational resources for 1) understanding the cultural stuff 101
2) really supporting community leaders in what they can do in their own communities that they lead in terms of their own practices as leaders and in how they show up as allies for folks.  So allyship training. 
3) Even more advanced would be to do some sort of in person leadership training with the Art of Leadership just for this community with an emphasis on diversity and inclusion. 

I guess it also goes back to these companies and who is "paid" to volunteer on Hyperledger stuff - shifting who gets hired to the big companies to work on this work is also a vector for change. 


I think there is something you can do that is very practical it is  1) Invitation - to things you are leading and participating in 2) Encouragement - how many of you reached out to technical women on your projects and said you know you should apply/put your name in the ring for that Technical Governance Board 

I know for me these two things tip me over the edge for things I think about doing. I LISTEN to the invitations (I know I'm welcome then- I have a backer if something happens (The invitee)) The encouragements - that is you aren't directly involved but know about - yeah you should do that...and then another  nudge after a week (Did you do it yet) and then even better get someone else to also encourage the person too. Not in a pushy way. In a real encouraging way. When they express challenges they might if taking on the thing - listen and be an ally in helping them see the challenges if they show up, if they get the role/position. 

Also, resource the people you want to show up and contribute. 
I have been asked several time why I don't "just volunteer" for a thing in the identity community. Yeah, I've volunteered doing so many things and so much intellectual and emotional labor it is just unbelievably large. At this point I can't afford to do the type of work this person was suggesting I do "for free".  If diversity is valuable then value it literally. 

Also below this is a list of folks who work more on addressing issues around People of Color diversity but a lot of it is

I hope all this helps. 
Happy to work with the Hyperledger/Linux foundation people on anything I outlined here. 

Regards, 
- Kaliya


Vaya Consulting lead by Nicole Sanchez. https://www.vayaconsulting.com
I heard her speak twice this week actually. Once at InteropITX and once at TechSuper Woman. She is fantastic in terms of her work doing cultural assessments and helping leadership understand what needs to change. 

Beyond the Culture of Separation, Programs for white-identified people who are committed to changing the story of separation. They have a weekend intensive coming up - https://beyondseparation.net/beyond-the-culture-of-separation/

The UnTraining folks offer a workshops http://untraining.org/groups/wlr but this isn't happening until the fall so isn't going to be helpful "now". 

Cook Ross also offers work for Unconscious bias and organizational transformation - https://cookross.com/cook-ross-model/


Robert Gass' and his Art of Leadership program engages with both personal leadership development, including a 360 assessment you give to peers and see the results at the workshop. The work gets to inclusion as well.  
The one time of year he himself teaches it is at Hollyhock (in Canada) in the summer - https://hollyhock.ca/programinfo/gass/

The Social Transformation Project has taken Robert's work and turned it into tools that organizations can use - http://stproject.org/resources/tools-for-transformation/equity-inclusion/ (one form doesn't fix the problem either)

Paul Kivel is based in Oakland and offers individual mentoring which may be a path worth considering too.   

Sharif Abdulah works on supporting build inclusive cultures and has been doing work globally with all types of organizations. I have briefed him a little bit about what has happened within the community.  http://www.commonway.org/node/71

Victor Lewis is also a fantastic human who you could engage to process the issues.  http://victorlewis.vpweb.com/About-Victor-Lee-Lewis.html





 
I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@...> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@..." <Identity-WG@...>, "architecture-wg@..." <architecture-wg@...>, "perf-and-scale-wg@..." <perf-and-scale-wg@...>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@...> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@...> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

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Re: How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Brian Behlendorf
 

Thanks Daniela, and all the others for their ideas and suggestions.  One more link I'll kick in, to the Linux Foundation's broad efforts in this space:

https://www.linuxfoundation.org/about/diversity-inclusiveness/

We'll take this feedback and come back with some suggestions for investment and improvement.  Meanwhile, much of the feedback was on ways many of you can help with this, by reaching out into your own organizations and areas of influence to create space for this.

I also read this as support for the proposal for the Community Health Working Group proposed by Tracy, Ry and David.  Of course it won't work if it's only LF staff on the proposal, so please consider joining the proposal.

Thanks,

Brian

On 08/23/2018 08:26 AM, Daniela Barbosa wrote:
My orginal response to Dan, went to Dan only, oops - my reply from Wed 4pmPST below>>>
great discussion ongoing, thanks.
~daniela
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Daniela Barbosa <dbarbosa@...>
Date: Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 4:16 PM
Subject: Private: Re: How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?
To: Dan O'Prey <dan@...>


Yes we need to do more. Thanks Bob and others for commenting on this thread.

On Dan's question on she(256)- 

In case you have missed it, one of our Keynotes for our Hyperledger Global Forum in Dec is Alexis Gauba who is the Co-Founder and Executive Director of she(256). In addition to a cool org name :-), they bill themselves as a movement to increase diversity and break down barriers to entry in the blockchain space. We were introduced to she(256) through Blockchain at Berkeley (Associate Member), and we have made some introductions to she(256) back into our community as well with members that are actively working on global diversity programs for example Accenture. I have met some of these women, and they blow me away. Since joining as an Associate, members of Blockchain at Berkeley are now also getting more involved with Hyperledger, including doing some work with Training and Education WG, to hopefully bring more Hyperledger into that academic community that she(256) is part of. Happy to direct connect and I will forward her this thread.

she(256) just launched a mentorship program  https://www.she256.io/mentorship and it would be great to see some Hyperlegder community members become mentors to some of these women, who then, in turn, could become leaders in our community. give to get  ;-)

Our ecosystems team has also been participating and reaching out to local events like Women in Blockchain, and Karen Ottoni is one of the co-organizers of the NYC event, which is one of the biggest groups out there. These are great places for us to engage with the community, and we need to show up. My observation has been that some of these communities have been very crypto focused in the past, but that is changing. We have a lot of work to do,

Last but not least, Hyperledger and the Linux Foundation is sponsoring The Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) this year which is the world's largest gathering of women technologists. It is produced by AnitaB.org and presented in partnership with ACM. We submitted a talk and it was accepted and will have a panel titled: "Fulfilling the Broken Promise of the Internet with Diversity in Mind"  on the topic of underrepresentation of women in blockchain with Marta Piekarska (Hyperledger), Artiona Bogo (SAP) , Hanna Zubko (Intellect EU) and Moderator Dev Bharel  (Nussbaumer) 

Many of our Members will also be at GHC, supporting their own diversity and recruiting objectives and it would be great if we had a united message on Hyperledger being a community that wants to support women in our industry. We will be reaching out via the Marketing committee- but if you know people in your org who are involved with Grace Hopper, please have them reach out to me directly dbarbosa@... 

It takes a village and I am glad I am part of this one.
~daniela

Daniela Barbosa
VP of World Wide Alliances, Hyperledger
Mobile/Text: 650.296.6969
The Linux Foundation
http://hyperledger.org


Daniela Barbosa
VP of World Wide Alliances, Hyperledger
Mobile/Text: 650.296.6969
The Linux Foundation
http://hyperledger.org


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 7:25 AM, Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

To clarify, my email wasn't a proposal to setup new groups. But where they do exist, especially where they were self-organized, it is probably a really good place to recruit leaders that may eventually want to run for the TSC.

-Shawn

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 4:59 AM, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@linuxfoundation.org> wrote:
Dear Dan
These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 
I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 
Thank you for bringing this up!
Have a great day
m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger

SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska

marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

Based in the U.K.

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 

On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

Sincerely,
Dan





On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:
There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:


We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

-Shawn

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:
Bob
I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 
I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 
This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 
Please do all keep suggestions coming. 
Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 
Rgds
Blythe

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 

On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.



On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:
Hi Bob,
I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

Just a thought,

Bill






On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...
  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.
Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.



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CTO, Clause Inc.
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Executive Director, Hyperledger
bbehlendorf@...
Twitter: @brianbehlendorf


Re: [Hyperledger Architecture WG] [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

Kyle Den Hartog <kyle.denhartog@...>
 

I think one thing Kaliya pointed out earlier that would be a huge first step to start would be for us all to invite one person who wouldn't fit the typical background (racial, gender, economic, nationality, and professional background are the five I consider important in this context) to come contribute to projects. I am no expert on this subject though, so I'll defer to hers and others expertise on the best ways to approach this and other next steps forward.

To go along with this, I think each of our projects can identify some key aspects that we need help with so we can more easily identify people who can bring nuance and diversity to the conversation. I know for us over in the Indy community, we'd love to have more people making core contributions to the IndySDK, Indy Node, and Indy Plenum projects, but there's ton of work that's just as important that people can help with outside of writing code. Another thing I'd like to see improved in Indy is documentation on both a technical level and business level. Along with this, it would be awesome to see some videos that could explain some of the tricky identity concepts. This is just my two cents worth though, but it's some ideas for people to take back to their communities and explore specific actions we can take to improve as a community.

-Kyle DH

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018, 4:55 PM =Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...> wrote:
So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@...> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@..." <Identity-WG@...>, "architecture-wg@..." <architecture-wg@...>, "perf-and-scale-wg@..." <perf-and-scale-wg@...>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@...> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@...> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

--



 

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--

Dan Selman

CTO, Clause Inc.

Chair of Accord Project Technology Working Group

 

The Royal Bank of Scotland plc, Registered in Scotland No. 90312. Registered Office: 36 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh EH2 2YB Authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. This e-mail message is confidential and for use by the addressee only. If the message is received by anyone other than the addressee, please return the message to the sender by replying to it and then delete the message from your computer. Internet e-mails are not necessarily secure. The Royal Bank of Scotland plc does not accept responsibility for changes made to this message after it was sent. The Royal Bank of Scotland plc may monitor e-mails for business and operational purposes. By replying to this message you give your consent to our monitoring of your email communications with us. Whilst all reasonable care has been taken to avoid the transmission of viruses, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that the onward transmission, opening or use of this message and any attachments will not adversely affect its systems or data. No responsibility is accepted by The Royal Bank of Scotland plc in this regard and the recipient should carry out such virus and other checks as it considers appropriate.



Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

=Drummond Reed <drummond.reed@...>
 

So if we agree we want to address the problem, what do we actually do? What steps in what order?

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 12:42 PM, Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...> wrote:
I don't think the Linux foundation should gather womens groups to gather to "to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture."

The new inclusive tech culture means men and by and large white men do the work they need to do on their own about how their culture is not working for "everyone else" and then doing something collectively to address it.  

"we" white women and men and women of color can't do the work that is really those in the dominant culture's to do. That is radically increase self-awareness about how much space you take up in meetings, how you interrupt "us", how you take our ideas, our code, play games and steal our work from us. 

Stop saying credit doesn't matter. 
Stop saying to white women and men and women of color come to you hoping you will be allies in a situation that "you should just walk away" no - you need to more often then not stand with them and SAY SOMETHING or better yet materially help them. 

These guys maybe helpful - https://wmfdp.com

If we do our work. You guys need to do your work. 

- Kaliya

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:37 AM, Mark Simpson <mark.simpson@...> wrote:

Great thread all !

 

And good to see Marta on this thread – a great ambassador for blockchain and women in tech!

 

I know there are lots of disparate groups of women in tech/blockchain etc, but I’m wondering if there is a way for the linux foundation to help bring these groups together, to share experiences and define a new inclusive tech culture.

 

Thanks

Mark

 

 

 

 

From: <perf-and-scale-wg@...ledger.org> on behalf of Kaliya Identity Woman <kaliya@...>
Date: Thursday, 23 August 2018 at 15:22
To: Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...>
Cc: "tsc@..." <tsc@...>, "Identity-WG@....org" <Identity-WG@....org>, "architecture-wg@...dger.org" <architecture-wg@...dger.org>, "perf-and-scale-wg@...ledger.org" <perf-and-scale-wg@...ledger.org>, "blythe@..." <blythe@...>
Subject: Re: [Hyperledger Performance and Scale WG] [Hyperledger Identity WG] [Hyperledger TSC] How can we improve diversity in the Hyperledger technical community?

 

I read through this thread.

 

At the very beginning it is about the TGC.

 

If you want women (and minorities) to run for positions in organizations like this you can’t just be “open” to them running you need to ask and invite and encourage them to run for positions like this.

 

I’m not on all the lists - this thread has happened on.

 

I don’t know that Womens only groups are ghettoizing. At a certain size organization they help women connect to each other - give mutual support and the type of encouragement and connection that is helpful when dealing with the default environment in tech that is inherently “hostile” (despite everyone’s well meaningless) 

 

I ran a Womens only tech conference for 10 years that lots of Women “who don’t do Womens only things” came to and loved so I have some experience of doing them well.

 

If hyper ledger wants to improve diversity it could consider training and education about how men can be more self aware to reduce the stuff that is so culturally normal but ultimately alienating. 

 

Just some thoughts. 

 

- Kaliya 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 7:07 AM, Vipin Bharathan <vipinsun@...> wrote:

Hi all,

 

On the Identity WG we promoted the diversity message at yesterday's call. There is already a strong contribution from women in the working group and on the paper, however more contributions and attendance on the calls are welcome. We also made the point about all dimensions of diversity during the call. 

 

You will have my personal support on the Identity working group, Architecture Working Group as well as PSWG (groups I am involved with). I agree with Marta's message that having women only groups may introduce a ghetto mentality; this was my experience in several writers groups in New York city. I refused to join the "Asian Writers Corner" back in the 90s. What we need is support from Hyperledger and the speakers bureau and inclusiveness in panels, speakers fora and other venues for all dimensions of diversity.  Of course this is difficult when the decision makers are concentrated in one segment. 

 

Often the debate can turn ugly like it did in Google and other venues when this matter came up- false judgement of competence and a sense of being unfairly wronged and discriminated against by the dominant group may resonate far and wide like it did in our own political process in the US and elsewhere. Of course I do not agree with those sentiments, but they exist. 

 

We only hear assenting voices in the emails, there is the silent majority to contend with. To be successful, any measure that we take has to be aware of those key but yet unvoiced complaints as well and address those head on. No one admits to being a racist or a sexist or an ageist and it may be very difficult to see in oneself since self-knowledge is the most difficult kind of knowledge. 

 

This is not going to be an easy issue to redress, tech in general suffers from this syndrome; most societies and groups are built on the basis of discriminatory culture. This is not to say that we need not address these issues; but acknowledge that it may take more than lip service and a few initiatives; nonetheless we must persevere with action for real change!

 

Best,

Vipin

  

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:10 AM brad rotter <brotter@...> wrote:

 

Marta

 

That was a superb point.

 

Just wanted to note that i am returning from speaking at a two blockchain conferences last week in Toronto.  

 

I observed a great number of woman at both events. Indeed, both conferences were produced by an amazing woman named Tracey Leparulo who runs Untraceable and has been involved in crypto since the early days of Ethereum.

 

Bradley Rotter

 

 

 

 


On Aug 23, 2018, at 05:59, Marta Piekarska <mpiekarska@...g> wrote:

Dear Dan

These are great ideas, thank you! One word of caution: doing women only groups, events and so on, tends to isolate women more than actually help. We are not a different spices and we don’t need special treatment;) the way we do not creat men only groups for male support, women only or American only or whatever only groups are not a good vehicle for increasing diversity. 

I think the fact that we are already having this discussion is really good, I’m very glad to see everyone’s concern. It is interesting that over half of Hyperledger staff is female but it does t seem to encourage higher participation from the community. 

Thank you for bringing this up!

Have a great day

m

Marta Piekarska
Director of Ecosystem, Hyperledger


SCHEDULE A MEETING WITH ME:  calendly.com/mpiekarska


marta@...
+447802336641 (U.K)
Signal, Wickr (martap)

 

Based in the U.K.

 

Sent from a mobile device, please excuse brevity. 


On 23 Aug 2018, at 10:36, Dan Selman <dan@...> wrote:

Contacting existing women maintainers and contributors 1:1 is an easy first step. Encourage them to apply to the TSC or to move from contributor to maintainer. Explain what it entails, and set up a "Women in Hyperledger" group where they can meet and mentor each other. Use HL funds to fly those interested to an inaugural women-only meetup/kick-off. Ask Blythe, Kathryn Harrison, Marie Wiek, Tracy, Daniella and other women in the industry to speak at the event. I'm sure IBM, Oracle, Intel, and others would sponsor if asked. Get press coverage to encourage more women to join HL. Allocate a budget for the "Women in HL" group so they can self-organize and decide on how best to encourage more participation.

 

My two cents. Happy to help if you need yet another middle-aged white man's opinion! :-)

 

Sincerely,

Dan

 

 

 

 

 

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:03 AM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

There are certainly female engineers within the projects, but not all engineers are subscribed to this mailing list.

 

In Minneapolis, there is an effort to get a "Women in Blockchain" meetup off the ground:

 

 

We plan to cross-promote this meetup with a larger blockchain meetup we run in Minneapolis, and hopefully it will get critical mass.

 

These meetups and maybe other events could be a good way to identify leaders who could be encouraged to participate and give presentations at Hyperledger events. (Which presumably is a good way to get name recognition within HL, etc., etc.)

 

-Shawn

 

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 1:00 PM, Blythe Masters via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <blythe=digitalasset.com@lists.hyperledger.org> wrote:

Bob

I'm reading along from vacation and very glad to hear some truth being spoken on this sorry topic. 

I'm also conscious that although I may be a lone female "role model" in the Hyperledger governance structure, I'm not an engineer or developer, so hardly have a recipe for navigation based on my own experience. What I've learned from the financial sector also reinforces that this is a very hard problem to address. 

This is bigger than a Hyperledger problem of course, but we can and should make an effort given the platform we have, and I have already asked Brian to put the topic on the agenda at our next governing board meeting. 

Please do all keep suggestions coming. 

Dan (O'Prey) and I have been discussing ok ur own ideas. 

Rgds

Blythe

 

Blythe Masters
Chief Executive Officer
c: +1 917 880 7829
e: blythe@... 


On Aug 22, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Dan - She(256) are great, yes.  I am personally involved with CryptoChicks, and am in contact with various other organizations working towards similar goals.
William - No women self-nominated.  Looking back through prior TSC elections, I don't think any women have ever self-nominated.

Before we get to solutions, I would like to ask the women of Hyperledger - how can we help?

https://bobsummerwill.com/2018/08/22/women-of-hyperledger-how-can-i-help-you/

There must be women on this mailing list.   They are who I would really like to hear from on this topic.

 

On Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 4:47 PM, William Sparks <wsparks@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

I am unclear if any females nominated themselves or were nominated?  Indeed a problem.  Elections happen and don’t always go as hoped.  Therefore, I propose the following for discussion:

 

1.  Perhaps a temp solution is to appoint an agreed number of at large TSC members selected by the LF and TSC.  I recognize this gets into governance but likely worth the effort. 

 

2.  Query the WG’s and projects for at large candidates that currently display avid participation within the HL umbrella.

 

Just a thought,

 

Bill

 

 

 

 

 


On Aug 21, 2018, at 17:21, Bob Summerwill <bob@...> wrote:

Further to this earlier thread:
https://lists.hyperledger.org/g/tsc/message/1591

And ...

  • All 29 TSC candidates are male.
  • All 11 existing TSC members are male.
  • Of the HL governing board 20/21 are male too, with the sole exception being Blythe Masters, the Chair.

Brian said ...

Thank you for bringing this up Bob, I agree that more can be done.

We are always open to ideas for more we could be doing as Linux Foundation staff on this project.  Diversity on the 10 internships we funded this cycle is greater than the below (I believe it's 3 out of the 10 but need to check).  We have provided support for a number of diversity-focused blockchain events and general computer industry events.  Let's start a new thread for any ideas folks might have about other approaches that can help.


 

--



 

--


This message, and any attachments, is for the intended recipient(s) only, may contain information that is privileged, confidential and/or proprietary and subject to important terms and conditions available at http://www.digitalasset.com/emaildisclaimer.html. If you are not the intended recipient, please delete this message.

 

--

Dan Selman

CTO, Clause Inc.

Chair of Accord Project Technology Working Group

 

The Royal Bank of Scotland plc, Registered in Scotland No. 90312. Registered Office: 36 St Andrew Square, Edinburgh EH2 2YB Authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority. This e-mail message is confidential and for use by the addressee only. If the message is received by anyone other than the addressee, please return the message to the sender by replying to it and then delete the message from your computer. Internet e-mails are not necessarily secure. The Royal Bank of Scotland plc does not accept responsibility for changes made to this message after it was sent. The Royal Bank of Scotland plc may monitor e-mails for business and operational purposes. By replying to this message you give your consent to our monitoring of your email communications with us. Whilst all reasonable care has been taken to avoid the transmission of viruses, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that the onward transmission, opening or use of this message and any attachments will not adversely affect its systems or data. No responsibility is accepted by The Royal Bank of Scotland plc in this regard and the recipient should carry out such virus and other checks as it considers appropriate.


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