Date   

Re: Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework

Lissuan Fadraga
 

Hi to all of you, 

I am new to Hyperlegder  Grid, I am trying to find a working example like AssetTrack or FishNet , can somebody help me to set up the AssetTrack example project , any guide or some ideas ?

thanks .. Lissuan.

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 11:09 PM Shawn Amundson <amundson@...> wrote:

To support Grid on Fabric, we need to add Transact support into Fabric so we can run Sabre smart contracts. I've been exploring this, but need an interested sponsor.

Thanks,

-Shawn

On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 1:16 PM Jim via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <jmason900=yahoo.com@...> wrote:
Any followup info available on this new solution ?  Test versions available ?  Documentation ?
If the framework is flexible enough, we can apply it to a variety of use cases.
I'll assume it's based on Hyperledger Fabric v2x ?


Have you registered for Hyperledger Global Forum, March 3-6?

Brian Behlendorf
 

Hello Hyperledger Community,


Less than four weeks to go until Hyperledger Global Forum 2020! I am so excited to see not only long time friends but all the new people, projects, deployments, and energy in our community. We've grown so much even just since the last Forum in Basel just over a year ago. This time no one needs to bundle up in scarves and mittens, as Arizona in springtime is gorgeous.


As digitally connected as our community is, in-person meetings like this are essential to developing a healthy Open Source software community. Community itself is an inherent part of blockchain technology - our ledger platforms are operating systems for cooperative networks. Whether you're a developer or product manager or business-level decision-maker, if you want to better understand the full scope of what everyone in the Hyperledger Greenhouse are building and deploying, and where the enterprise blockchain movement is going, you want to be here!


I wanted to make sure that you do not miss out on standard pricing, which ends on February 18. Save up to $400 if you register by the deadline. Hotel rooms will most likely sell out in advance - I encourage you to book ASAP to secure a room at the conference rate, which was just extended through Friday, Feb 14.


At Global Forum, you will have the chance to talk directly with Hyperledger project maintainers and the Technical Steering Committee, collaborate with other developers and executives on ideas that will directly impact the future of Hyperledger. Plus you get to promote your work among the enterprise blockchain community.


This year’s agenda will feature more than 80 sessions, including dozens of breakout sessions plus panels, workshops and a Demo Theater. You can search the agenda and also browse by filter type including industry, project focus. There’s some really great technical sessions/workshops lined up that I would like to highlight:



Going into Production! Performance Best Practices in Hyperledger Fabric - Alfonso De la Rocha Gómez-Arevalillo, Telefónica

Hyperledger Fabric is getting traction in the corporate world, with more and more companies deploying Fabric-based projects and PoCs. One of the main limitations Telefonica’s found is getting a PoC into production because of a lack of performance best practices. In this talk Alfonso will answer common performance questions such as: What configurations should I fine-tune to get the most out of my infrastructure? And How many peers, endorsers and ordering nodes do I need?


Governing DLT Networks - David Treat, Accenture & Rob Palatnick, DTCC

Accenture and DTCC have co-authored a paper, Governing DLT Networks, and will present their work with David Treat, MD, Global Blockchain Lead at Accenture and member of the Hyperledger Board and Rob Palatnick, CTO of DTCC and Chair of the Hyperledger Board. Proposing a governance operating model to address approaches to managing the activity, connectivity, software changes, contractual agreements and transaction finality for every participant across the network.


Blockchain Platform For A Billion Customers: A Telecom (Digital Marketing) Case Study - Babu Jayaraj, Reliance Jio Infocom Ltd.

India with 1.2+ Billion registered mobile subscribers have been plagued with unsolicited communications from the unregistered telemarketers. A consortium of telecom operators under the TRAI's guidance have built a Blockchain based platform to regulate marketing communications. This talk is about learnings/experiences in designing and building the Hyperledger Fabric based platform by consortium of telecom operators including choosing right technologies, overcoming platform stability issues, scaling performance and building business practices/process around the new platform.


Building Secure Protocols Using Ursa- Mike Lodder, Sovrin Foundation & Brent Zundel, Evernym

It's notoriously difficult to properly implement blockchain protocols that use cryptographic algorithms.In this talk, Mike and Brent will explain some of the features in Hyperledger Ursa and how to use them to solve some of the most common problems faced by people looking to build private and secure protocols on blockchains.


A Standardized Approach to Creating Digital Tokens - Paul DiMarzio, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance; Marley Gray, Microsoft & Jonathan Levi, HACERA

In this session, the speakers will lay out the value of digital tokens and dive into a few examples of how the Token Taxonomy Framework (TTF) can be used to simplify the design and implementation of new token classes.

DIDs without blockchains - Daniel Hardman, Evernym,

Decentralized Identifiers (DIDs) are like DNS without any registrars. They're a foundation of decentralized identity, and are relevant to most Hyperledger projects. In this session, Daniel will explain how peer DIDs work, and show developers how they can get support for them in an hour or a day (depending on their circumstances).


Panel: Business Interoperability – The Key to Supply Chain Traceability - Rich Meszaros & Sarah Banks, Accenture; Melanie Nuce, GS1 US; David Cecchi, Cargill

Technology such as blockchain has the power to solve complex challenges and achieve improved supply chain traceability. In order to tap into this powerful technology, interoperability, enabled by robust data and transaction standards, are a must! Segments of the supply chain, such as the food industry, have made significant progress leveraging data standards to support food safety and product transparency use cases.

Workshop: Intro to Hyperledger Besu - Danno Ferrin, ConsenSys

There is no better way to learn about Hyperledger Besu than by doing.In this session attendees will set up and run Hyperledger Besu nodes that connect to public networks as well as start their own permissioned network between the other attendees in the session.


Workshop: Hyperledger Fabric 101 - Swetha Repakula & Morgan Bauer, IBM

The workshop will involve participants standing up their own Hyperledger Fabric network, deploying smart contracts, and interacting with their contracts using decentralized applications. Attendees will leave the tutorial with a better understanding of the properties of permissioned blockchains, and decentralized application development. Recently announced Hyperledger Fabric 2.0 features and updates will also be explored.


Workshop: Hands-on Experience with Avalon on How to Bridge On-chain and Off-chain Worlds - Yevgeniy Yarmosh & Dan Anderson, Intel

Avalon addresses blockchain scalability and privacy challenges by moving compute intensive and private data processing off-chain. Other similar approaches typically trade resilience and integrity for scalability and privacy. During this workshop, you will understand Avalon architecture and how it extends a notion of computational trust.


Workshop: Getting Started with Indy and Aries: Beginner and Advanced Scenarios - Stephen Curran, Cloud Compass Computing, Inc. & John Jordan, Government of British Columbia (Canada),

This full day technical workshop will cover beginner and advanced sessions on getting started with Hyperledger Indy and Hyperledger Aries.

Keynote speakers confirmed so far:

Keynote: Don Tapscott: The Blockchain Revolution -State of the Union, Co-author, Blockchain Revolution: How the Technology Behind Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies is Changing the World, and Co-founder, Blockchain Research Institute

Keynote: Sheila Warren: Blockchain Matters: How it’s Already Changing the World, Head of Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technology, World Economic Forum


Other unique activities I’m personally excited about:


Diversity Happy Hour 

March 2, 6:00 - 8:30pm

Location: Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel, Rooftop


Mentoring Session

March 3, 8:00 - 8:50am

Location: Phoenix Convention Center


Onsite Networking Reception & Booth Crawl

March 3,5:45 - 6:45pm

Location: Phoenix Convention Center, Sponsor Showcase


Hyperledger Public Meetup

March 3, 6:45 - 8:00pm

Location: Phoenix Convention Center


Offsite All Attendee Party

March 4, 7:00 - 10:00pm

Location: Corona Ranch and Rodeo Grounds


I look forward to seeing you there!

Brian




-- 
Brian Behlendorf
Executive Director, Hyperledger
bbehlendorf@...
Twitter: @brianbehlendorf


Grid on Splinter

Shawn Amundson
 

Grid now supports a second distributed ledger, Splinter:


This is an exciting step for Grid. The Grid daemon has been refactored to support multiple backend implementations for distributed ledgers. And Grid's requirements are feeding back into Splinter features, which is fantastic.

-Shawn


Re: Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework

Shawn Amundson
 


To support Grid on Fabric, we need to add Transact support into Fabric so we can run Sabre smart contracts. I've been exploring this, but need an interested sponsor.

Thanks,

-Shawn


On Wed, Jan 29, 2020 at 1:16 PM Jim via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <jmason900=yahoo.com@...> wrote:
Any followup info available on this new solution ?  Test versions available ?  Documentation ?
If the framework is flexible enough, we can apply it to a variety of use cases.
I'll assume it's based on Hyperledger Fabric v2x ?


Re: Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework

Jim
 

Any followup info available on this new solution ?  Test versions available ?  Documentation ?
If the framework is flexible enough, we can apply it to a variety of use cases.
I'll assume it's based on Hyperledger Fabric v2x ?


Re: Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework

VIPIN BHARATHAN
 

Hi Erik,
Thanks for your note on DA focused on entertainment. 
We in the capital markets SIG under hyperledger recently hosted Marley Gray from Microsoft and the Token Taxonomy Initiative where he presented the Token Taxonomy Framework. They have released a version 1.0 of the framework which is compositional and comprehensive. They are also developing some tooling around this. We, in the CMSIG may collaborate with them on developing the custody use case.
You might like to collaborate with us as well as the TTF and Grid. 
Thanks,
Vipin


From: grid@... <grid@...> on behalf of Erik Hanzlick via Lists.Hyperledger.Org <erik.hanzlick=ibm.com@...>
Sent: Monday, January 6, 2020 5:58 PM
To: grid@...
Cc: James Wilson
Subject: [Hyperledger Grid] Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework
 
Hi HL Grid Group,
 
Happy new year! My name is Erik Hanzlick and I'm an offering manager at IBM. With my team and group of business partners, we're building an open-source project called the Digital Asset Trust Framework (DATF). We intend to provide a similar structure of resources (chaincode templates, client libraries, etc.) to HL Grid but focused on digital asset supply chains such as movies, audio, research data, etc. on Hyperledger Fabric.
 
The Hyperledger Grid project is a huge inspiration for us and I was hoping to get in touch with one of the founders/managers of the project to learn about how you got to be where you are today. We're still early on in our development and would love to get wisdom from your team. 
 
I'll leave a link to our industry paper our published recently. Our initial focus is on media and entertainment since we work closely with many of the studios and the industry. 
 
 
If this looks interesting and you have the time in the next two weeks, let's coordinate and get on a call. Otherwise, I'll catch your team on your next public call.
 
Cheers,
 
Erik Hanzlick
Offering Manager
IBM Aspera | erik.hanzlick@...


Intro - Digital Asset Trust Framework

Erik Hanzlick
 

Hi HL Grid Group,
 
Happy new year! My name is Erik Hanzlick and I'm an offering manager at IBM. With my team and group of business partners, we're building an open-source project called the Digital Asset Trust Framework (DATF). We intend to provide a similar structure of resources (chaincode templates, client libraries, etc.) to HL Grid but focused on digital asset supply chains such as movies, audio, research data, etc. on Hyperledger Fabric.
 
The Hyperledger Grid project is a huge inspiration for us and I was hoping to get in touch with one of the founders/managers of the project to learn about how you got to be where you are today. We're still early on in our development and would love to get wisdom from your team. 
 
I'll leave a link to our industry paper our published recently. Our initial focus is on media and entertainment since we work closely with many of the studios and the industry. 
 
 
If this looks interesting and you have the time in the next two weeks, let's coordinate and get on a call. Otherwise, I'll catch your team on your next public call.
 
Cheers,
 
Erik Hanzlick
Offering Manager
IBM Aspera | erik.hanzlick@...


Upcoming Event: Hyperledger Grid Quarterly Update Due #tsc-project-update - Thu, 11/21/2019 #tsc-project-update #cal-reminder

grid@lists.hyperledger.org Calendar <grid@...>
 

Reminder: Hyperledger Grid Quarterly Update Due #tsc-project-update

When: Thursday, 21 November 2019

View Event

Organizer: community-architects@...

Description: The Hyperledger Grid project update to the TSC is due 18 November, 2019, and it will be presented to the TSC on 21 November, 2019.

Please be sure that someone from the community completes the update and is available to present it to the TSC.


Re: First time impressions

Andrea Gunderson
 

Thanks for the feedback. Sorry for the slow response.

I would suggest taking a look at the Sawtooth Documentation https://sawtooth.hyperledger.org/docs/core/releases/latest/ This will help with understanding the address format and initializeing the blockchain. Currently Grid smart contracts can be run on Hyperledger Sawtooth using the Sawtooth Sabre smart contract engine https://sawtooth.hyperledger.org/docs/sabre/nightly/master/.

I would also suggest asking questions in https://chat.hyperledger.org/channel/grid so more people can weigh in.


On Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 3:44 AM Aaron Digulla <digulla@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,

I'm looking into blockchain for a prototype project. I know a bit about blockchain from high level articles but haven't really used it before. Below, I'm collecting my thoughts, impressions and suggestions from reading your documentation for the first time.

---

Introduction: How about adding a link to gs1.org for the text "GS1 product definitions"?

---

Re "Addressing" in "Grid Schema Transaction Family Specification"

For me, it's unclear where those hash collisions can happen. There doesn't seem to be a query API. As I understand it, the objects are just serialized and concatenated as blocks in the blockchain. The type "SchemaList" is also mentioned exactly once in the documentation (or maybe the search is broken).

The type is used 6 times in the code on GitHub but there are no unit tests, no place where a list is created and put into the blockchain, etc. I find this part very confusing.

Later, the name of the schema is used to look them up instead of the address. What use is the address?

---

In a more general context, how do I initialize a Grid blockchain? I'm missing a flow chart or graph or examples which explain how to implement certain scenarios like catching / transporting / selling fish or ordering (replacement) parts from a supplier. Something that helps to put all parts into a realistic context.

---

In https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/pike_transaction_family.html is this sentence:

        Agents whose addresses collide are stored in an agent list.

When I read that the first time, I had missed that hashes are computed for some objects. So this was very confusion. How about adding a link here to "Addressing" https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/grid_schema_family_specification.html?highlight=address#addressing

Also, the data structure isn't used anywhere else in the documentation. I'd expect a query API where I can ask for a list of all agents of an organization but there are no query APIs at all.

---

How can I find out whether an agent is allowed to do a certain operation?
If that's out of scope for the project, then how about pointing to another project which solves this?

---

https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/grid_track_and_trace_family_specification.html

        Under this scheme, 16^2 * (16^4 - 1) = 16776960 entries

That formula is confusing for me. I understand that "16" is the number of states per hex digit and "4" is the number of digits but I've never seen this approach in any other text. How about

    256 * (2^16 - 1) = 16776960

This reuses the existing numbers in the text and the usual term (2^16) to represent 16 bits of precision (64 K).

Which made me think: What happens when I append "xxxx"? Is there a check in the code which makes sure it's a hex number?

Also, what's the point? Property changes are appended to the blockchain just like any other data. Why do I have to give these change "pages" an address? I can read all of them into a list grouped by record_id (which again isn't the address). That can return me any number of records which I must be able to handle. There isn't really an upper limit to the number of changes I can get. I also don't see why this should be a ring buffer.

Example fish. Fish is caught. Then we monitor the temperature of the ice chamber on the factory ship since the fish will stay in there for weeks, maybe months. If I would add one measurement per seconds, the "buffer" would last 16776960/3600/24 = 194 days. Enough for the whole trip.

But the temperature doesn't change very fast, so "once per second" doesn't make sense. Also, I'm not really interested in every data point. The average and highest temperature of the whole voyage is enough to determine that the fish is still good. I understand that there is an issue of trust, so having the raw data in the blockchain will help with that.

That leaves the issue of storage: How much memory would the temperature sensor need to buffer all this data points? I doubt that any sensor in the chain would buffer all the data. Instead, they're going to commit small updates every few minutes. Maybe once per hour. So the Transaction Processor should never have to buffer more than a few pages.

Also unclear for me: After committing a change, does the next update start with namespace 0001? What if the next update is from a different Transaction Processor?

What happens when a page has only 10 values? Can I "edit" it and post an update with the same "address" and 11 values? Or "save" if once more with 10 entries but some with different values? Or do I have to start a new page?

Lastly, I really don't like the idea that page 0000 is special. I would prefer two namespaces, one for master properties (= change rarely if ever) and time series properties (which change often). Each page should use the hash of the previous page to chain them, so there is no upper limit.

---

Quote:

        Any transaction is invalid if its timestamp is greater than the validator’s system time.

Is the validator always going to share the same clock hardware? If not, then there will be differences. If the system clock is a few seconds off on either side, this will cause spurious failures. The same will happen for configuration mistakes, time zone / DST problems, ect. I'm especially ware of IoT devices like temperature sensors.

The documentation should give pointers how to prevent this for sure. One approach could be to add a shared clock service where people have to get their timestamps from or NTP with close monitoring or an "offset" approach where the IoT device just counts ticks and adds those to a base timestamp in an initial record.

Alternatively, the system could just accept a time which isn't more than 1 minute in the "future" (to handle small glitches).

My fear is that someone "fixes" the problem my just putting 1 or some other, fixes data in the past into the timestamp.

---

As with agents above: How can I find out the current state of a record or proposal?

---

Regards,

--
Aaron "Optimizer" Digulla a.k.a. Philmann Dark
"It's not the universe that's limited, it's our imagination.
Follow me and I'll show you something beyond the limits."
http://blog.pdark.de/





First time impressions

Aaron Digulla
 

Hi everyone,

I'm looking into blockchain for a prototype project. I know a bit about blockchain from high level articles but haven't really used it before. Below, I'm collecting my thoughts, impressions and suggestions from reading your documentation for the first time.

---

Introduction: How about adding a link to gs1.org for the text "GS1 product definitions"?

---

Re "Addressing" in "Grid Schema Transaction Family Specification"

For me, it's unclear where those hash collisions can happen. There doesn't seem to be a query API. As I understand it, the objects are just serialized and concatenated as blocks in the blockchain. The type "SchemaList" is also mentioned exactly once in the documentation (or maybe the search is broken).

The type is used 6 times in the code on GitHub but there are no unit tests, no place where a list is created and put into the blockchain, etc. I find this part very confusing.

Later, the name of the schema is used to look them up instead of the address. What use is the address?

---

In a more general context, how do I initialize a Grid blockchain? I'm missing a flow chart or graph or examples which explain how to implement certain scenarios like catching / transporting / selling fish or ordering (replacement) parts from a supplier. Something that helps to put all parts into a realistic context.

---

In https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/pike_transaction_family.html is this sentence:

Agents whose addresses collide are stored in an agent list.

When I read that the first time, I had missed that hashes are computed for some objects. So this was very confusion. How about adding a link here to "Addressing" https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/grid_schema_family_specification.html?highlight=address#addressing

Also, the data structure isn't used anywhere else in the documentation. I'd expect a query API where I can ask for a list of all agents of an organization but there are no query APIs at all.

---

How can I find out whether an agent is allowed to do a certain operation?
If that's out of scope for the project, then how about pointing to another project which solves this?

---

https://grid.hyperledger.org/docs/grid/nightly/master/transaction_family_specifications/grid_track_and_trace_family_specification.html

Under this scheme, 16^2 * (16^4 - 1) = 16776960 entries

That formula is confusing for me. I understand that "16" is the number of states per hex digit and "4" is the number of digits but I've never seen this approach in any other text. How about

256 * (2^16 - 1) = 16776960

This reuses the existing numbers in the text and the usual term (2^16) to represent 16 bits of precision (64 K).

Which made me think: What happens when I append "xxxx"? Is there a check in the code which makes sure it's a hex number?

Also, what's the point? Property changes are appended to the blockchain just like any other data. Why do I have to give these change "pages" an address? I can read all of them into a list grouped by record_id (which again isn't the address). That can return me any number of records which I must be able to handle. There isn't really an upper limit to the number of changes I can get. I also don't see why this should be a ring buffer.

Example fish. Fish is caught. Then we monitor the temperature of the ice chamber on the factory ship since the fish will stay in there for weeks, maybe months. If I would add one measurement per seconds, the "buffer" would last 16776960/3600/24 = 194 days. Enough for the whole trip.

But the temperature doesn't change very fast, so "once per second" doesn't make sense. Also, I'm not really interested in every data point. The average and highest temperature of the whole voyage is enough to determine that the fish is still good. I understand that there is an issue of trust, so having the raw data in the blockchain will help with that.

That leaves the issue of storage: How much memory would the temperature sensor need to buffer all this data points? I doubt that any sensor in the chain would buffer all the data. Instead, they're going to commit small updates every few minutes. Maybe once per hour. So the Transaction Processor should never have to buffer more than a few pages.

Also unclear for me: After committing a change, does the next update start with namespace 0001? What if the next update is from a different Transaction Processor?

What happens when a page has only 10 values? Can I "edit" it and post an update with the same "address" and 11 values? Or "save" if once more with 10 entries but some with different values? Or do I have to start a new page?

Lastly, I really don't like the idea that page 0000 is special. I would prefer two namespaces, one for master properties (= change rarely if ever) and time series properties (which change often). Each page should use the hash of the previous page to chain them, so there is no upper limit.

---

Quote:

Any transaction is invalid if its timestamp is greater than the validator’s system time.

Is the validator always going to share the same clock hardware? If not, then there will be differences. If the system clock is a few seconds off on either side, this will cause spurious failures. The same will happen for configuration mistakes, time zone / DST problems, ect. I'm especially ware of IoT devices like temperature sensors.

The documentation should give pointers how to prevent this for sure. One approach could be to add a shared clock service where people have to get their timestamps from or NTP with close monitoring or an "offset" approach where the IoT device just counts ticks and adds those to a base timestamp in an initial record.

Alternatively, the system could just accept a time which isn't more than 1 minute in the "future" (to handle small glitches).

My fear is that someone "fixes" the problem my just putting 1 or some other, fixes data in the past into the timestamp.

---

As with agents above: How can I find out the current state of a record or proposal?

---

Regards,

--
Aaron "Optimizer" Digulla a.k.a. Philmann Dark
"It's not the universe that's limited, it's our imagination.
Follow me and I'll show you something beyond the limits."
http://blog.pdark.de/


Examples of Grid application

Kyle Shu
 

Hi there,

I am currently researching DLT solutions for supply chain use cases, and I found Grid might be a good match for my org. Are there any examples I can start with to see how Grid solves real-world supply chain problems?

--
Kyle Shu


Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, October 21st at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

The next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, October 21st at 10am CDT.

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.
Here is the direct link to the meeting: https://zoom.us/j/933448029

We are collecting agenda items for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meeting!
-Mark


Let us know First Major Release of Grid project.

wyslhs@lotte.net
 

Would you let me know when the First Major Release of Grid project is announced?
I will include it in our private SCM blockchain platform when it comes.

Thanks.


REMINDER: Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting on 9/16/2019 at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

Just a reminder that the next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, September 16th at 10am CDT.

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.
Here is the direct link to the meeting: https://zoom.us/j/933448029

We are still collecting agenda items for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Thanks
-Mark


Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Wednesday, September 16th at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

The next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, September 16th at 10am CDT.

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.
Here is the direct link to the meeting: https://zoom.us/j/933448029

We are collecting agenda items for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meeting!
-Mark


REMINDER: Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, August 19th at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

REMINDER: The next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, August 19th at 10am CDT.

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.
Here is the direct link to the meeting: https://zoom.us/j/933448029

We are still collecting agenda items for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meeting!
-Mark


Upcoming Event: Hyperledger Grid Quarterly Update Due #tsc-project-update - Thu, 08/22/2019 #tsc-project-update #cal-reminder

grid@lists.hyperledger.org Calendar <grid@...>
 

Reminder: Hyperledger Grid Quarterly Update Due #tsc-project-update

When: Thursday, 22 August 2019

View Event

Organizer: community-architects@...

Description: The Hyperledger Grid project update to the TSC is due 19 August, 2019, and it will be presented to the TSC on 22 August, 2019.

Please be sure that someone from the community completes the update and is available to present it to the TSC.


Call for Agenda Items for the Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting on 8/19/2019 at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

The next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, August 19th at 10am CDT.

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.
Here is the direct link to the meeting: https://zoom.us/j/933448029

We are creating the agenda for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meeting!
-Mark


Re: Hyperledger Grid on Parity Substrate

steve.degosserie@...
 

FYI, for anyone interested to pursue this investigation, the repo has been published over here: https://github.com/stiiifff/substrate-grid

Steve


REMINDER: Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, July 15th at 10am CDT

Mark Ford
 

Hi all,

Reminder that our next Hyperledger Grid Contributor Meeting is Monday, July 15th at 10am CDT. 

The meeting information can be found on the Hyperledger Community Meetings Calendar.

We are finalizing the agenda for this meeting. If you have an appropriate topic you would like to facilitate, please add it to the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our next meeting!
-Mark