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How you and the places where you work are handling the current pandemic?


Hou, Feng
 

Hi ALL.

 

As we are all anxiously waiting for this pandemic to be over, I want to wish all of the EASIG members, no matter where you are in our global village, to stay healthy and be hopeful! Since the mayor of St. Louis City where Maryville University is located has issued an executive order for the residents to stay home, our university campus has now been closed, and the employees have been asked to work from home.

 

Last week, I have been asked by University Business Magazine to share with their subscribers our university’s strategies and tips re. how we mobilize the entire university community, students, faculty and staff to have moved all classes online and to work from home in such a short notice of time, I told them even though no one could have predicted the coronavirus ordeal, Maryville has as part of our digital transformation made the strategic decision to move as much as we can our courses and student support services online long before the pandemic started. Our Digital World initiative and our current strategic lighthouse projects such as Digital Employee, Student Digital ID and Blockchain University have all played major roles in helping our students getting services online.

 

If you would, I’d like to hear how you and the places where you work are handling the situation.

 

Thanks and stay well!

 

Feng

 

Feng Hou

Chair of EASIG     


Taylor Kendal
 

Feng,

Thanks for sharing that local perspective, and good to hear that so much of your prior work is paying off now for students through tough times. 

Our work at Learning Economy, being largely remote anyhow, hasn’t been affected as dramatically, but I’ve heard from a wide array of edu colleagues/networks and the response at their school/campuses has been...say, varied. Some seem to be embracing the moment (maybe too much), while others sadly seem to be in utter disarray. CU Denver, where I also teach, seems to be somewhere in the middle. Ill-timed political pandering and righteousness from the top, scared and recklessly proactive faculty factions enacting something akin to Martial Law, and students being mostly adaptive and understanding. 

Suppose the more pressing issue for me is why it takes a pandemic for us to collectively wake up and realize that supporting virtual (modern?) education (and the spotlight on inequity that comes with it) is, has been, and always will be important. Is HigherEd pro or reactive and are we perhaps ready to discuss it openly and honestly? 🤷‍♂️


Here’s a related piece (3/5 in series) I recently wrote. Something of an ironic situational assessment for those so inclined. 


Be well and do your part for the collective curve,
-TK


Erik Anderson
 

> Here’s a related piece (3/5 in series) I recently wrote. Something of an ironic situational assessment for those so inclined. 

I just briefly read your article, Blockchain and Education is a disillusionment.

Once again, Blockchain is a religion, a cult, irrational trend.

I am not seeing how its solving any problem in education. This cult of Blockchain followers is disillusioned with the promise of a database, an append only database, magically solving some problem?

Remote learning where kids futures are no longer based on the ZIP code they were born in, thats important. Virtual learning is paramount because the pandemic will impact the cultures of businesses & education, the future of work.

Upskilling and Reskilling are topics that should be discussed, not "insert Blockchain here". We are in a virus based economy and many "old economy" jobs will not come back, upskilling/reskilling are going to be more important than ever.

Erik

On Wed, Mar 25, 2020, at 1:07 AM, Taylor Kendal wrote:


Feng,

Thanks for sharing that local perspective, and good to hear that so much of your prior work is paying off now for students through tough times. 


Our work at Learning Economy, being largely remote anyhow, hasn’t been effected as dramatically, but I’ve heard from a wide array of edu colleagues/networks and the response at their school/campuses has been...say, varied. Some seem to be embracing the moment (maybe too much), while others sadly seem to be in complete disarray. CU Denver, where I also teach, seems to be somewhere in the middle. Ill-timed political pandering and righteousness from the top, scared and recklessly proactive faculty factions enacting something akin to Martial Law, and students being mostly adaptive and understanding. 

Suppose the more pressing issue for me is why it takes a pandemic for us to collectively wake up and realize that supporting virtual (modern?) education (and the inequity spotlight that come with it) is, has been, and always will be important. Is HigherEd pro or reactive and are we perhaps ready to discuss it openly and honestly? 🤷‍♂️



Here’s a related piece (3/5 in series) I recently wrote. Something of an ironic situational assessment for those so inclined. 




Be well and do your part for the collective curve,
-TK


Hou, Feng
 

Hi Eric,

 

You obviously are trying to make a point. But, I do not agree with you that blockchain is a religion, much less a cult or “irrational trend”. According to Deloitte’s 2019 Global Blockchain Survey, 53 percent of surveyed senior executives from a dozen countries said that blockchain was a critical priority for their organizations. More than 40 percent reported that their firms planned to spend at least $5 million on the technology over the next 12 months.

 

Blockchain may not have solved any major problem in education yet, but it will when more and more institutions are tokenizing education to create more smart learning pathways to help students succeed. I also believe blockchain can improve our current student load system to support and reward students for what the student loan programs are supposed to do: learning.

 

You may choose to bury your head in the sand, but please DO NOT insult the people in this group like myself who believe in blockchain by calling us a “cult”. If you want to engage in a civil discussion or even a debate, fine but you need to be cognizant of the word you choose to use.

 

Feng Hou

Chair, EASIG

 

 

 

From: education-architecture-sig@... [mailto:education-architecture-sig@...] On Behalf Of Erik Anderson
Sent: Thursday, March 26, 2020 8:22 AM
To: education-architecture-sig@...
Subject: Re: [education-architecture-sig] How you and the places where you work are handling the current pandemic?

 

CAUTION:This email originated outside of Maryville University. Review links and attachments carefully before opening.

 

> Here’s a related piece (3/5 in series) I recently wrote. Something of an ironic situational assessment for those so inclined. 

 

I just briefly read your article, Blockchain and Education is a disillusionment.

 

Once again, Blockchain is a religion, a cult, irrational trend.

I am not seeing how its solving any problem in education. This cult of Blockchain followers is disillusioned with the promise of a database, an append only database, magically solving some problem?

 

Remote learning where kids futures are no longer based on the ZIP code they were born in, thats important. Virtual learning is paramount because the pandemic will impact the cultures of businesses & education, the future of work.

 

Upskilling and Reskilling are topics that should be discussed, not "insert Blockchain here". We are in a virus based economy and many "old economy" jobs will not come back, upskilling/reskilling are going to be more important than ever.

 

Erik

On Wed, Mar 25, 2020, at 1:07 AM, Taylor Kendal wrote:

 

Feng,

 

Thanks for sharing that local perspective, and good to hear that so much of your prior work is paying off now for students through tough times. 

 

Our work at Learning Economy, being largely remote anyhow, hasn’t been effected as dramatically, but I’ve heard from a wide array of edu colleagues/networks and the response at their school/campuses has been...say, varied. Some seem to be embracing the moment (maybe too much), while others sadly seem to be in complete disarray. CU Denver, where I also teach, seems to be somewhere in the middle. Ill-timed political pandering and righteousness from the top, scared and recklessly proactive faculty factions enacting something akin to Martial Law, and students being mostly adaptive and understanding. 

Suppose the more pressing issue for me is why it takes a pandemic for us to collectively wake up and realize that supporting virtual (modern?) education (and the inequity spotlight that come with it) is, has been, and always will be important. Is HigherEd pro or reactive and are we perhaps ready to discuss it openly and honestly? 🤷‍♂️

 

 

Here’s a related piece (3/5 in series) I recently wrote. Something of an ironic situational assessment for those so inclined. 

 

 

 

Be well and do your part for the collective curve,

-TK